Posts Tagged ‘Shorewood retirement community’

Accordionist Frank Rossi Sings at the Timbers

Accordionist and Vocalist Frank Rossi at the Timbers of ShorewoodFrank Rossi, accordionist and vocalist, will entertain residents and the public at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11, at The Timbers of Shorewood, 1100 N. River Rd., Shorewood.

Rossi plays a Roland RD 300 SX digital piano and both an Italo American and an Imperial accordion. He plays many solo jobs and also has his own jazz standard duo. His favorite accordion players are Manny Quartucci and Mike Alongi.

Rossi’s music career all started when he was seven because his Godparents dropped his name in a glass jar at the Symphony School of Music in Chicago Heights. His name was drawn, which awarded him six free accordion lessons.

He began his studies on the accordion under the late Al Rush. Then he won a first place trophy at the Illinois State Fair in Springfield, and he’s been hooked on the accordion ever since.

After graduating with a double major of finance and management from Eastern Illinois University, he decided to continue his passion – music studies. Rossi began private lessons from the late accordion and piano great Ed Baldacci from whom he learned harmony training as well as advanced technical studies.

Recently named the 2010 recipient of the Order Sons of Italy Leonardo da Vinci Award of Excellence in Performing Arts, Rossi can be found performing in fine dining establishments around the Chicagoland area.

The Timbers of Shorewood is a rental retirement community which provides independent and assisted living apartments as well as a full schedule of activities and services. Furnished apartments are also available for a short-term stay – a weekend, a week, a month or longer.

The public is invited, and admission is free. For more information call Shelly Goggins at 815-609-0669

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Quality of Life Seminar: Tips for Cold & Flu Season

A health professional will present a program about cold and flu awareness at 2 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 9, at The Timbers of Shorewood retirement community, 1100 N. River Rd., Shorewood.

Flu season can begin as early as October, and last as late as May. For this reason, October or November is the best time to get vaccinated.

Symptoms of the flu may include:
•    Fever (usually high)
•    Headache
•    Extreme Tiredness
•    Dry Cough
•    Sore Throat
•    Runny or Stuffy Nose
•    Muscle Aches

Stomach symptoms like nausea, vomiting and diarrhea may occur, though it is more common in children.

Complications of the flu can include:
•    Pneumonia
•    Dehydration
•    Worsening of chronic medical conditions like asthma, emphysema and heart disease

Colds usually last for about a week. Symptoms of a cold may include:
•    Runny nose
•    Congestion
•    Sneezing
•    Weakened sense of taste and smell
•    Scratchy throat
•    Cough

Cold and flu viruses enter the body through the mucous membranes of the eyes, nose or mouth. Every time you touch your hand to one of these areas you could be infecting yourself. It is important to wash your hands often

The Timbers of Shorewood is a rental retirement community which provides independent and assisted living apartments and a full schedule of activities and services. Furnished apartments are also available for a short-term stay – a weekend, a week, a month or longer.

The program is open to the public and admission is free. For more information or to register, call Shelly Goggins at 815-609-0669.

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Singer and Accordionist Don Reitsma Entertains at Timbers of Shorewood

Don Reitsma Singer and Accordionist Entertains at TimbersDon Reitsma will perform in the ballroom at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 14, at the Timbers of Shorewood retirement community, 1100 N. River Road. This is a free event and is open to the public.

Reitsma is an established entertainer having toured the United States, Europe and Canada. He has performed on radio, television and for a wide variety of special events. He is a highly versatile musician with a rich baritone voice who plays the keyboard, accordion, piano and organ.

The Timbers of Shorewood is a rental retirement community which provides independent and assisted living apartments and a full schedule of activities and services. Residents, whose needs may change, are able to stay in the same place and receive appropriate care.

This event is free and open to the public. For more information, call Shelly Goggins at 815-609-0669

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Guitarist Steve Askins performs songs of yesteryear at Timbers of Shorewood

Guitarist Steve Askins at the TimbersSteve Askins will perform at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, in the ballroom at the Timbers of Shorewood retirement community, 1100 N. River Road. This is a free event and is open to the public.

Askins started performing at the age of 14, and has continued to do so for over three decades. Adept in a variety of musical styles, Askins’ dynamic, expressive vocal style and virtuosity on the guitar have earned him a positive reputation in northern and central Illinois.

Steve’s passion for the songs of yesteryear has led him develop a specialty for entertaining seniors throughout the Chicago land area by mixing classic greats with a modern edge. He combines his musicianship with humor to provide energetic and upbeat shows.

“Seniors really seem to appreciate hearing the music from the era that I call ‘Golden Years of American Popular Music’ and it is so gratifying to see their toes tapping, singing, and dancing,” Askins said. “I specialize in programs for senior citizens and do nearly 300 shows per year.”

The Timbers of Shorewood is a rental retirement community which provides independent and assisted living apartments and a full schedule of activities and services. Residents, whose needs may change, are able to stay in the same place and receive appropriate care.

This event is free and open to the public. For more information, call Shelly Goggins at 815-609-0669

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Seniors Assess Denture Care

You may have no teeth, but you still need to see the dentist. Bummer, right? According to www.seniorsdaily.net, gum care is important – teeth or no teeth – and a dental professional needs to make certain that dentures fit properly. They may need to be relined, and they may no longer fit correctly.

Of course, dentures are the last resort, and every effort should be made to keep permanent teeth as long as possible. Even if you have lost some teeth, a partial denture is preferable to removal of all remaining teeth if those teeth are still in acceptable condition.
A denture is a removable replacement for missing teeth and surrounding tissues. Two types of dentures are available – complete and partial dentures. Complete dentures are used when all the teeth are missing, while partial dentures are used when some natural teeth remain.

According to www.webmd.com, complete dentures can be either “conventional” or “immediate.” Made after the teeth have been removed and the gum tissue has begun to heal, a conventional denture is ready for placement in the mouth about 8 to 12 weeks after the teeth have been removed.

Unlike conventional dentures, immediate dentures are made in advance and can be positioned as soon as the teeth are removed. As a result, the wearer does not have to be without teeth during the healing period.

 However, bones and gums shrink over time, especially during the healing period following tooth removal. Therefore a disadvantage of immediate dentures compared with conventional dentures is that they require more adjustments to fit properly during the healing process and generally should only be considered a temporary solution until conventional dentures can be made.

A removable partial denture or bridge usually consists of replacement teeth attached to a pink or gum-colored plastic base, which is connected by metal framework that holds the denture in place in the mouth. Partial dentures are used when one or more natural teeth remain in the upper or lower jaw. A fixed (permanent) bridge replaces one or more teeth by placing crowns on the teeth on either side of the space and attaching artificial teeth to them. This “bridge” is then cemented into place. Not only does a partial denture fill in the spaces created by missing teeth, it prevents other teeth from changing position. A precision partial denture is removable and has internal attachments rather than clasps that attach to the adjacent crowns. This is a more natural-looking appliance.

Are There Alternatives to Dentures?

Yes, dental implants can be used to support permanently cemented bridges, eliminating the need for a denture. The cost is usually greater, but the implants and bridges more closely resemble the feel of real teeth. Dental implants are becoming the alternative to dentures but not everyone is a candidate for implants. Consult your dentist for advice.

Does Insurance Cover the Cost of Dentures?

Most dental insurance providers cover some or all of the cost of dentures. However, contact your company to find out the specifics of what they will cover.

How Are Dentures Made?

The denture development process takes about three weeks to 1.5 months and several appointments. Once your dentist or prosthodontist (a dentist who specializes in the restoration and replacement of teeth) determines what type of appliance is best for you, the general steps are to:

1. Make a series of impressions of your jaw and take measurements of how your jaws relate to one another and how much space is between them.

2. Create models, wax forms, and/or plastic patterns in the exact shape and position of the denture to be made. You will “try in” this model several times and the denture will be assessed for color, shape, and fit before the final denture is cast.

3. Cast a final denture

4. Adjustments will be made as necessary

A dozen facts about dentures (www.denturehelp.com):

1. Dentures don’t last forever.

2. Even if dentures fit perfectly, you should still see a dental professional regularly.

3. No one has to know you’re wearing dentures.

4. Denture wearers can eat more normally.

5. Denture wearers can speak more clearly.

6. Adhesives can play a role in denture’s fit and comfort.

 7. Over-the-counter and prescription medications can affect dentures.

8. Don’t assume regular denture care is too costly.

9. Never try to make your own denture repairs.

 10. With planning, denture corrections can often be made in one day.

 11. Don’t avoid replacing your denture just because you don’t want to go through another long adjustment period.

12. All dentures are not created equal. If you look for the lowest price, you’ll get what you pay for.

 

 

 

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‘How to keep your memory stronger longer’ program

Arlene Albert of DeerBrook Care Center will present a program titled, “Keep Your Memory Stronger Longer” at 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 19, at The Timbers of Shorewood, 1100 N. River Road, Shorewood.
 
Forgetting where you placed your keys, the name of a person, or where you are going can happen at any age. Though memory lapses can be aggravating and occur at any age, it is more pressing among older adults.
 
Seniors with increasing memory lapses can raise concern and fear of possible diseases associated with memory loss including depression, dementia, Alzheimers, and physical injury.
 
Older seniors may take longer to learn and recall information simply because the mind is not as quick as it used to be. But in most cases, if the mind is exercised through simple daily routines memory loss can be halted as well as prevented.
 
Mayo Clinic suggests several tips to help prevent memory loss:
 
1.    Stay mentally active
 
Just as physical activity helps keep your body in shape, mentally stimulating activities help keep your brain in shape — and perhaps keep memory loss at bay. Do crossword puzzles. Read a section of the newspaper that you normally skip. Take alternate routes when driving. Learn to play a musical instrument. Volunteer at a local school or community organization.
 
2.    Socialize regularly
 
Social interaction helps ward off depression and stress, both of which can contribute to memory loss. Look for opportunities to get together with loved ones, friends and others — especially if you live alone. When you’re invited to share a meal or attend an event, go!
 
3.    Get organized
 
You’re more likely to forget things if your home is cluttered and your notes are in disarray. Jot down tasks, appointments and other events in a special notebook, calendar or electronic planner. You might even repeat each entry out loud as you jot it down to help cement it in your memory. Keep to-do lists current, and check off items you’ve completed. Set aside a certain place for your wallet, keys and other essentials.
 
4.    Focus
 
Limit distractions, and don’t try to do too many things at once. If you focus on the information that you’re trying to remember, you’ll be more likely to recall it later. It might also help to connect what you’re trying to remember to a favorite song or another familiar concept.
 
5.    Eat a healthy diet
 
A heart-healthy diet may be as good for your brain as it is for your heart. Focus on fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Choose low-fat protein sources, such as fish, lean meat and skinless poultry. What you drink counts, too. Not enough water or too much alcohol can lead to confusion and memory loss.
 
6.    Include physical activity in your daily routine
 
Physical activity increases blood flow to your whole body, including your brain. This may help keep your memory sharp. For most healthy adults, the Department of Health and Human Services recommends at least 150 minutes a week of moderate aerobic activity (think brisk walking) or 75 minutes a week of vigorous aerobic activity (such as jogging) — preferably spread throughout the week. If you don’t have time for a full workout, squeeze in a few 10-minute walks throughout the day.
 
7.    Manage chronic conditions
 
Follow your doctor’s treatment recommendations for any chronic conditions, such as diabetes, high blood pressure and depression. The better you take care of yourself, the better your memory is likely to be. In addition, review your medications with your doctor regularly. Various medications can impact memory.

The Timbers of Shorewood is a rental retirement community which provides independent living and assisted living apartments and a full schedule of activities and services. Furnished apartments are also available for a short-term stay – a weekend, a week, a month or longer.

The event is free and open to the public. For more information contact Shelly Goggins at (815) 609-0669.

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Seniors in Shorewood tackle arthritis

Oh my aching knee… so says someone with arthritis – one of the most prevalent chronic health problems in America. According to arthritis.org, 46 million people suffer from it. That’s one in five adults. That’s a lot.

Arthritis strikes more women than men, and half of those Americans with arthritis don’t think anything can be done to help them. Of course, Baby Boomers are now at prime risk. More than half those affected are under age 65.
Arthritis is the inflammation of one or more joints which results in pain, swelling, stiffness, and limited movement. There are over 100 different types of arthritis.

Arthritis involves the breakdown of cartilage. Cartilage normally protects the joint, allowing for smooth movement. Cartilage also absorbs shock when pressure is placed on the joint, like when a person walks. Without the usual amount of cartilage, the bones rub together, causing pain, swelling (inflammation), and stiffness.

Osteoarthritis is the most common type and is more likely to occur with aging. It may be felt in any joint, but according to Mayo Clinic, (www.mayoclinic.com)  the most common affected joints are hands, hips, knees, neck and lower back.
Factors that increase the risk of osteoarthritis include older age, gender, bone deformities, joint injuries, obesity, and certain occupations that involve repetitive stress on a particular joint. Also people with gout, rheumatoid arthritis, Paget’s disease of bone or septic arthritis are at increased risk of developing osteoarthritis.

The bad news is osteoarthritis gradually worsens with time, and no cure exists. But osteoarthritis treatments can relieve pain and help maintain an active lifestyle.

The following are ideas that can help a great deal:

  • If you’re experiencing pain or inflammation in your joint, rest it for 12 to 24 hours. Find activities that don’t require repetitive movement. Try taking a 10-minute break every hour.
  • With the doctor’s approval, get regular exercise. Stick to gentle exercises, such as walking, biking or swimming. Exercise can increase endurance and strengthen the muscles around the joint, making the joint more stable. Avoid exercising tender, injured or swollen joints. If you feel new joint pain, stop. New pain that lasts more than two hours after you exercise probably means you’ve overdone it.
  • Being overweight or obese increases the stress on your weight-bearing joints, such as your knees and your hips. Even a small amount of weight loss can relieve some pressure and reduce your pain. Aim to lose 1 or 2 pounds a week, at most. Most people combine changes in their diet with increased exercise.
  • Both heat and cold can relieve pain in your joint. Heat also relieves stiffness and cold can relieve muscle spasms. Soothe a painful joint with heat using a heating pad, hot water bottle or warm bath. Heat should be warm, not hot. Apply heat for 20 minutes several times a day. Cool the pain in your joint with cold treatments such as with ice packs. You can use cold treatments several times a day, but don’t use cold treatments if you have poor circulation or numbness.
  • Creams and gels available at the drugstore may provide temporary relief from osteoarthritis pain. Some creams numb the pain by creating a hot or cool sensation. Other creams contain medications, such as aspirin-like compounds, that are absorbed into your skin. Pain creams work best on joints that are close the surface of your skin, such as your knees and fingers.
  • Assistive devices can make it easier to go about your day without stressing your painful joint. A cane may take weight off your knee or hip as you walk. Gripping and grabbing tools may make it easier to work in the kitchen if you have osteoarthritis in your fingers. Your doctor or occupational therapist may have ideas about what sorts of assistive devices may be helpful to you. Catalogs and medical supply stores also may be places to look for ideas.

And finally, learn about living your best life with arthritis. Understand the challenges and changes arthritis brings on and how they affect relationships and families. Find practical solutions to make daily activities easier as well as the information you need to deal with health insurance and the cost of care.

 

 

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Yoga for seniors in Joliet

Yoga for Seniors at th Timbers of ShorewoodYoga: a young person twisted up like a pretzel with apparent ease. That image is not necessarily the complete story. In fact, yoga is for all ages; no one is too old or too young for yoga.

One of the great things about yoga is that it is so adaptable to different populations with various physical abilities and needs. Most seniors are doing what they can to maintain and improve a sense of health and wellness. Many of the 36 million or so Americans who are 65 or older (stat provided by: about.com) are turning to yoga to keep them stay agile and in shape.

Although the trend is to become more sedentary, retirement is actually the perfect time to pick up healthy habits that will promote longevity. Yoga is well-suited for seniors, because it is low-impact, and risk of injury is minimal because the discipline does not require any contact with anyone or anything. In addition, yoga’s weight-bearing postures help build or maintain lean muscle mass, and its focus on balance develops coordination.

Yoga also helps combat many of the health conditions that come with age such as high blood pressure, arthritis and incontinence, because it keeps the body toned, strong and flexible..

An added benefit (and an important one) is the sense of community seniors find at yoga classes. As many elders live in isolation, the group setting of a yoga class offers seniors a way to connect.

According to dietsinreview.com, there are many yoga postures that can be safely performed by seniors. Such postures have both a restorative and therapeutic benefit to them. Of course, adaptations and adjustments should be made according to the person’s health status and their physical ability.

  • Easy Pose (Sukhasana): The simple act of sitting down and breathing deeply and fully has an enormous capacity to tone the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems while also lengthening the spine, resting the mind, and cultivating a sense of peace. The beginner can do this posture for a minimum of 10 breaths and gradually work up to maintaining this posture for five to 10 minutes.
  • Cat Pose (Bidalasana): This grounding posture helps tone the arm muscles while also strengthening the core and alleviating tightness in the low and upper back and neck. The beginner can do this posture for a minimum of five breath cycles and gradually work their way to doing more.

Older adults should get clearance from their doctor before starting a yoga practice. This is especially relevant for those who take medications or have a prior or current history of cardiovascular or pulmonary conditions. In addition, individuals should also seek out classes specifically designed for seniors, as they will take into account the unique health issues affecting them

Yoga classes especially for seniors are becoming increasingly available: check local senior centers, retirement communities, religious organizations and even health clubs.

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Another Bruise?

What causes that dark, unsightly mark on a limb known as a bruise? Unable to remember bumping into anything, an older adult may be baffled about how a new bruise happened. It’s common to experience easy bruising with increasing age, because blood vessels become more fragile with age.

Bruises result when trauma or a blow to the body damages or ruptures tiny blood vessels under the skin. Not only are the elderly more prone to bruising, less force is required to cause a bruise. And with greater impact, deeper bruises of the muscles or bone can happen, which take longer to heal.

According to A Place for Mom, the medical term for a bruise is a contusion. What happens is blood leaks out of the vessels and initially appears as a bright or dark red, purple or black mark. Eventually the body reabsorbs the blood, and the mark disappears. If a bruise increases in size and becomes swollen and hard, it may be a hematoma, a localized collection of blood which becomes clotted or partially clotted.

Some people – especially women – are more prone to bruising than are others. In fact, several factors may contribute to increased bruising, including (Mayo Clinic):

  • Aging capillaries – Over time, the tissues supporting these vessels weaken, and capillary walls become more fragile and prone to rupture.
  • Thinning skin – With age, skin becomes thinner and loses some of the protective fatty layer that helps cushion blood vessels against injury. Excessive exposure to the sun accelerates the aging process in the skin.

Generally, the harder the blow, the larger the bruise. However, if a person bruises easily, a minor bump – one they may not even notice – can result in substantial discoloration. Arms and legs are typical locations for bruises.

Blood-thinning drugs such as aspirin and warfarin (Coumadin) or medications such as clopidogrel (Plavix) reduce the blood’s ability to clot. Because of this, bleeding from capillary damage that would normally stop quickly may take longer to stop, allowing enough blood to leak out to cause a bruise.

In addition, certain dietary supplements such as fish oil and ginkgo also may increase bruising, because these supplements have a blood-thinning effect. Make certain the doctor knows about any supplements.

Bruise prevention

Below are some steps to take to prevent bruising from falls and collisions:

  • Hold the handrails on stairways.
  • Don’t stand on a chair to get to something.
  • Clear floors where you walk.
  • Mount grab bars near toilets, tubs and showers.
  • Place non-skid mats, strips, or carpet on all surfaces that may get wet.
  • Put night lights and light switches close to your bed.
  • Tack down all carpets and area rugs.
  • Always close cabinet doors and drawers so you won’t run into them.
  • Be especially careful around pets.
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Seniors in Joliet eager for Spring

The months of March and April hold the promise of spring. In terms of seasons, the worst is behind, and the best is ahead. Poets such as William Wordsworth and Robert Browning agree. Enjoy these poems about early spring.

“The year’s at the spring
And day’s at the morn;
Morning’s at seven;
The hillside’s dew-pearled;
The lark’s on the wing;
The snail’s on the thorn;
God’s in His heaven -
All’s right with the world!”

- Robert Browning

“Harshness vanished. A sudden softness
has replaced the meadows’ wintry grey.
Little rivulets of water changed
their singing accents. Tendernesses,
hesitantly, reach toward the earth
from space, and country lanes are showing
these unexpected subtle risings
that find expression in the empty trees.”

- Rainer Marie Rilke

“I wonder if the sap is stirring yet,
If wintry birds are dreaming of a mate,
If frozen snowdrops feel as yet the sun
And crocus fires are kindling one by one:
Sing robin, sing:
I still am sore in doubt concerning Spring.”

- Christina Rossetti

“I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.”

- William Wordsworth, Daffodils

“Oh, give us pleasure in the flowers in the flowers today;
And give us not to think so far away
As the uncertain harvest; keep us here
All simply in the springing of the year.

Oh, give us pleasure in the orchard white,
Like nothing else by day, like ghosts by night;
And make us happy in the happy bees,
The swarm dilating round the perfect trees.”

- Robert Frost, A Prayer in Spring

“The cock is crowing,
The stream is flowing,
The small birds twitter,
The lake doth glitter,
The green field sleeps in the sun;
The oldest and youngest
Are at work with the strongest;
The cattle are grazing,
Their heads never raising;
There are forty feeding like one!

Like an army defeated
The snow hath retreated,
And now doth fare ill
On the top of the bare hill;
The Plowboy is whooping-anon-anon:
There’s joy in the mountains;
There’s life in the fountains;
Small clouds are sailing,
The rain is over and gone!”

- William Wordsworth

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