Posts Tagged ‘Joliet retirement community’

Guitarist Steve Askins performs songs of yesteryear at Timbers of Shorewood

Guitarist Steve Askins at the TimbersSteve Askins will perform at 6:30 p.m. Friday, Sept. 7, in the ballroom at the Timbers of Shorewood retirement community, 1100 N. River Road. This is a free event and is open to the public.

Askins started performing at the age of 14, and has continued to do so for over three decades. Adept in a variety of musical styles, Askins’ dynamic, expressive vocal style and virtuosity on the guitar have earned him a positive reputation in northern and central Illinois.

Steve’s passion for the songs of yesteryear has led him develop a specialty for entertaining seniors throughout the Chicago land area by mixing classic greats with a modern edge. He combines his musicianship with humor to provide energetic and upbeat shows.

“Seniors really seem to appreciate hearing the music from the era that I call ‘Golden Years of American Popular Music’ and it is so gratifying to see their toes tapping, singing, and dancing,” Askins said. “I specialize in programs for senior citizens and do nearly 300 shows per year.”

The Timbers of Shorewood is a rental retirement community which provides independent and assisted living apartments and a full schedule of activities and services. Residents, whose needs may change, are able to stay in the same place and receive appropriate care.

This event is free and open to the public. For more information, call Shelly Goggins at 815-609-0669

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‘Be wary,’ say seniors in Joliet

Watching network TV for an evening is a blur of commercials, many of them health related. Each remedy promises easy solutions to a host of ailments. It’s easy to understand the appeal of these promises, but there is still plenty of truth to the old saying, “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.”

Today, there are more ways than ever to sell untested products. In addition to TV, radio, magazines, newspapers, infomercials, mail, telemarketing, and even word-of-mouth, these products are now offered over the Internet—with websites describing miracle cures and emails telling stories of overnight magic. Sadly, older people are often the target of such scams.

According to National Institute on Aging, the problem is serious. Untested remedies may be harmful. They may be dangerous when used with medicines prescribed by the doctor, they may waste money, and sometimes, using these products keeps people from getting the medical treatment they need.

Living with a chronic health problem is difficult, so it’s easy to see why people might fall for a false promise of a quick and painless cure. What makes the elderly so vulnerable to this kind of thing? After all, they’re not stupid. They are, however, trusting. They don’t expect crooks to be calling them. They want to take people at their word. They don’t want to appear rude by hanging up on a caller.

According to Associate Content.com Elderly people also tend to worry about their health and the increasing costs of medical care, and this makes them vulnerable to scams offering phony health insurance. In addition, elderly people are embarrassed about falling for such scams and don’t want their children to find out. They may fear that their children will think they are no longer competent to care for themselves and may worry about losing their independence.

Typically, ads or telemarketing calls target diseases that have no cures like diabetes, arthritis, and Alzheimer’s disease.
Beware:

  • Cancer cures
  • Anti-aging medications
  • Arthritis remedies
  • Memory aids
  • Dietary supplements
  • Health insurance

Question what you see or hear in ads, telephone calls, or on the internet. Find out about a product before you buy. Don’t let a salesperson talk you into making a snap decision. Most important, check with your doctor first.

Look for red flags in ads or promotional material that:

  • Promise a quick or painless cure
  • Claim the product is made from a special, secret, or ancient formula
  • Offer products and services only by mail
  • Use statements or unproven case histories from so-called satisfied patients
  • Claim to be a cure for a wide range of ailments
  • Claim to cure a disease (such as arthritis or Alzheimer’s disease) that hasn’t been cured by medical science
  • Promise a no-risk, money-back guarantee
  • Offer an additional “free” gift or a larger amount of the product as a “special promotion”
  • Require advance payment and claim there is a limited supply of the product

Two Federal government agencies work to protect people from health scams. The Federal Trade Commission can help you spot fraud. The Food and Drug Administration protects the public by assuring the safety of prescription drugs, biological products, medical devices, food, cosmetics, and radiation-emitting products. If you have questions about a product, again talk to your doctor.

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Concert in the Park features accordionist Bob Doczak

Accordionist Bob Doczak takes the stage for the July Concert in the Park at the Timbers of ShorewoodAccordionist Bob Doczak takes the stage for the July Concert in the Park from 6:30 – 8 p.m. Sunday, July 24, on the outdoor patio at The Timbers of Shorewood, 1100 N. River Rd., Shorewood. The public is invited to the free concert.

Born in Joliet, Doczak grew up in a neighborhood that consisted of Slovenians, Croatians and people of Polish descent so polka music literally filled the streets. With 42 years in the polka business, he is one of the key organizers of the annual Illinois Polka Festival held each February in Naperville.

The popular series of summer evening concerts called “The Timbers’ Concert in the Park” is a favorite event. A few years ago, neighbors with homes near The Timbers heard the music, and they started setting up lawn chairs in their yards. Staff at The Timbers invited them to join the residents, and today, concerts are an amiable blend of residents, neighbors, friends, families, and the public.

The Timbers of Shorewood is a rental retirement community which provides senior independent living and assisted living apartments and a full schedule of activities and services. Furnished apartments are also available for a short-term stay – a weekend, a week, a month or longer.

Again, the event is free and open to the public. For more information, call Shelly Goggins at 815-609-0669.

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Yoga for seniors in Joliet

Yoga for Seniors at th Timbers of ShorewoodYoga: a young person twisted up like a pretzel with apparent ease. That image is not necessarily the complete story. In fact, yoga is for all ages; no one is too old or too young for yoga.

One of the great things about yoga is that it is so adaptable to different populations with various physical abilities and needs. Most seniors are doing what they can to maintain and improve a sense of health and wellness. Many of the 36 million or so Americans who are 65 or older (stat provided by: about.com) are turning to yoga to keep them stay agile and in shape.

Although the trend is to become more sedentary, retirement is actually the perfect time to pick up healthy habits that will promote longevity. Yoga is well-suited for seniors, because it is low-impact, and risk of injury is minimal because the discipline does not require any contact with anyone or anything. In addition, yoga’s weight-bearing postures help build or maintain lean muscle mass, and its focus on balance develops coordination.

Yoga also helps combat many of the health conditions that come with age such as high blood pressure, arthritis and incontinence, because it keeps the body toned, strong and flexible..

An added benefit (and an important one) is the sense of community seniors find at yoga classes. As many elders live in isolation, the group setting of a yoga class offers seniors a way to connect.

According to dietsinreview.com, there are many yoga postures that can be safely performed by seniors. Such postures have both a restorative and therapeutic benefit to them. Of course, adaptations and adjustments should be made according to the person’s health status and their physical ability.

  • Easy Pose (Sukhasana): The simple act of sitting down and breathing deeply and fully has an enormous capacity to tone the cardiovascular and pulmonary systems while also lengthening the spine, resting the mind, and cultivating a sense of peace. The beginner can do this posture for a minimum of 10 breaths and gradually work up to maintaining this posture for five to 10 minutes.
  • Cat Pose (Bidalasana): This grounding posture helps tone the arm muscles while also strengthening the core and alleviating tightness in the low and upper back and neck. The beginner can do this posture for a minimum of five breath cycles and gradually work their way to doing more.

Older adults should get clearance from their doctor before starting a yoga practice. This is especially relevant for those who take medications or have a prior or current history of cardiovascular or pulmonary conditions. In addition, individuals should also seek out classes specifically designed for seniors, as they will take into account the unique health issues affecting them

Yoga classes especially for seniors are becoming increasingly available: check local senior centers, retirement communities, religious organizations and even health clubs.

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Quality of Life program explores the eyes

William G. Grant. M. D. of Vision Mission GroupWilliam G. Grant, O.D. of Vision Mission Group will present a ‘Quality of Life’ health seminar about the eyes at 10 a.m. Thursday, May 26, at the Timbers of Shorewood retirement community, 1100 N. River Rd., Shorewood. The public is welcome to join the residents for this free presentation.

As the economic crisis continues, some seniors may believe it’s reasonable to skip their annual eye exam. But for the older population, it’s critically important to keep tabs on the silent stealers of sight – cataracts, glaucoma, macular degeneration and diabetic eye disease.

By age 65, one-in-three Americans have some form of vision-impairing eye disease.

By detecting and treating eye disease early through annual, comprehensive dilated exams, seniors can do so much to preserve their sight.

Cataracts

A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye that affects vision. Most cataracts are related to aging and are very common in older people. In fact, by age 80, more than half of all Americans either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery.

The symptoms of early cataracts may include fading colors, poor night vision, cloudy or blurry vision, double vision, or frequent prescription changes. These symptoms can be improved with new eyeglasses, brighter lighting, anti-glare sunglasses, or magnifying lenses. If such remedies don’t help, surgery is the only effective treatment. Surgery involves removing the cloudy lens and replacing it with an artificial lens. The visual results are typically excellent with modern surgical techniques.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a disease that can damage the eye’s optic nerve. It is one of the leading causes of blindness in the United States and the most common cause of blindness among African-Americans. More than three million Americans have glaucoma, but half do not realize it because there are often no warning symptoms.

In most cases, there are no symptoms during the early stages of the disease. However, as glaucoma progresses, it slowly damages the optic nerve fibers of the eye and the peripheral field of vision narrows which can create “blind spots.” Anyone age 60 or older are at risk and especially so if there’s a family history of glaucoma

Medication in the form of eyedrops or pills is the most common early treatment for glaucoma. Laser procedures or surgery are available options when needed.

Age related macular degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) is a leading cause of vision loss in Americans 50 years of age and older. ARMD is a disease that blurs the sharp, central vision you need for straight-ahead activities such as reading, sewing, and driving. ARMD affects the macula, the part of the eye that allows you to see fine detail.

ARMD occurs in both a wet and dry form of the condition. Slow occurring or “dry” ARMD affects 90 percent of those with the condition. Fast occurring or “wet” ARMD affects 10 percent of ARMD cases. Slightly blurred vision is the most common symptom of ARMD. Other symptoms may include wavy lines or a blind spot in the center of the field of vision. Those at risk are people over age 75, women, smokers, those with a family history of the disease, and people with elevated cholesterol.

Medication and/or laser surgery can aid some cases of wet ARMD. At the present time, there is no effective treatment for advanced dry ARMD, however treatment can delay and possibly prevent intermediate ARMD from progressing. More ways to slow the progression is to take a good multi-vitamin, stop smoking, wear UV protective sunglasses outdoors, and eat plenty of green leafy vegetables.

Diabetic eye disease

Approximately 16 million people in the United States have diabetes and one-third of them do not know it. People with diabetes are 25 times more likely to become blind. With early detection and proper treatment, severe visual loss can usually be prevented.

Diabetic retinopathy is the most common diabetic eye disease and is a leading cause of blindness in American adults. It is caused by changes in the blood vessels of the retina, the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. In some people with diabetic retinopathy, blood vessels may swell and leak fluid. In other people, abnormal new blood vessels grow on the surface of the retina. Laser procedures and surgery are available options when needed.

People with diabetes should have a professional eye examination as soon as their diabetes is diagnosed and at least once a year thereafter. It is also extremely important to monitor and manage blood sugar levels. By detecting and treating diabetic eye disease early through annual, dilated eye exams, people with diabetes can preserve their site.

The Timbers of Shorewood is a rental retirement community which provides independent and assisted living apartments and a full schedule of activities and services. Furnished apartments are also available for a short-term stay – a weekend, a week, a month or longer.

For more information, call Shelly Goggins at 815-609-0669 or visit http://www.timbersofshorewood.com.

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Another Bruise?

What causes that dark, unsightly mark on a limb known as a bruise? Unable to remember bumping into anything, an older adult may be baffled about how a new bruise happened. It’s common to experience easy bruising with increasing age, because blood vessels become more fragile with age.

Bruises result when trauma or a blow to the body damages or ruptures tiny blood vessels under the skin. Not only are the elderly more prone to bruising, less force is required to cause a bruise. And with greater impact, deeper bruises of the muscles or bone can happen, which take longer to heal.

According to A Place for Mom, the medical term for a bruise is a contusion. What happens is blood leaks out of the vessels and initially appears as a bright or dark red, purple or black mark. Eventually the body reabsorbs the blood, and the mark disappears. If a bruise increases in size and becomes swollen and hard, it may be a hematoma, a localized collection of blood which becomes clotted or partially clotted.

Some people – especially women – are more prone to bruising than are others. In fact, several factors may contribute to increased bruising, including (Mayo Clinic):

  • Aging capillaries – Over time, the tissues supporting these vessels weaken, and capillary walls become more fragile and prone to rupture.
  • Thinning skin – With age, skin becomes thinner and loses some of the protective fatty layer that helps cushion blood vessels against injury. Excessive exposure to the sun accelerates the aging process in the skin.

Generally, the harder the blow, the larger the bruise. However, if a person bruises easily, a minor bump – one they may not even notice – can result in substantial discoloration. Arms and legs are typical locations for bruises.

Blood-thinning drugs such as aspirin and warfarin (Coumadin) or medications such as clopidogrel (Plavix) reduce the blood’s ability to clot. Because of this, bleeding from capillary damage that would normally stop quickly may take longer to stop, allowing enough blood to leak out to cause a bruise.

In addition, certain dietary supplements such as fish oil and ginkgo also may increase bruising, because these supplements have a blood-thinning effect. Make certain the doctor knows about any supplements.

Bruise prevention

Below are some steps to take to prevent bruising from falls and collisions:

  • Hold the handrails on stairways.
  • Don’t stand on a chair to get to something.
  • Clear floors where you walk.
  • Mount grab bars near toilets, tubs and showers.
  • Place non-skid mats, strips, or carpet on all surfaces that may get wet.
  • Put night lights and light switches close to your bed.
  • Tack down all carpets and area rugs.
  • Always close cabinet doors and drawers so you won’t run into them.
  • Be especially careful around pets.
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Seniors in Joliet eager for Spring

The months of March and April hold the promise of spring. In terms of seasons, the worst is behind, and the best is ahead. Poets such as William Wordsworth and Robert Browning agree. Enjoy these poems about early spring.

“The year’s at the spring
And day’s at the morn;
Morning’s at seven;
The hillside’s dew-pearled;
The lark’s on the wing;
The snail’s on the thorn;
God’s in His heaven -
All’s right with the world!”

- Robert Browning

“Harshness vanished. A sudden softness
has replaced the meadows’ wintry grey.
Little rivulets of water changed
their singing accents. Tendernesses,
hesitantly, reach toward the earth
from space, and country lanes are showing
these unexpected subtle risings
that find expression in the empty trees.”

- Rainer Marie Rilke

“I wonder if the sap is stirring yet,
If wintry birds are dreaming of a mate,
If frozen snowdrops feel as yet the sun
And crocus fires are kindling one by one:
Sing robin, sing:
I still am sore in doubt concerning Spring.”

- Christina Rossetti

“I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.”

- William Wordsworth, Daffodils

“Oh, give us pleasure in the flowers in the flowers today;
And give us not to think so far away
As the uncertain harvest; keep us here
All simply in the springing of the year.

Oh, give us pleasure in the orchard white,
Like nothing else by day, like ghosts by night;
And make us happy in the happy bees,
The swarm dilating round the perfect trees.”

- Robert Frost, A Prayer in Spring

“The cock is crowing,
The stream is flowing,
The small birds twitter,
The lake doth glitter,
The green field sleeps in the sun;
The oldest and youngest
Are at work with the strongest;
The cattle are grazing,
Their heads never raising;
There are forty feeding like one!

Like an army defeated
The snow hath retreated,
And now doth fare ill
On the top of the bare hill;
The Plowboy is whooping-anon-anon:
There’s joy in the mountains;
There’s life in the fountains;
Small clouds are sailing,
The rain is over and gone!”

- William Wordsworth

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What smells so good?

Nose - Sense of Smell - Joliet Assisted LivingSniff, sniff. Imagine the smell of a stargazer lily or of fresh baked bread. Imagine throwing open the window on one of spring’s first warm days and smelling the sweet air. These are some of life’s free gifts.

But also imagine if smell was missing. None of us really notice all the smells around us, but for those whose sense of smell is diminished or missing, it can be a significant loss.

Olfaction is the sense of smell. It’s part of a person’s chemical sensing system, along with the sense of taste. Normal smell occurs when odors around a person, like the fragrance of flowers or the smell of baking bread, stimulate specialized sensory cells, called olfactory sensory cells which are located in a small patch of tissue high inside the nose.

Odors reach the olfactory sensory cells via two pathways. The first pathway is by inhaling, or sniffing, through the nose. When people think about smell, they generally think of this pathway.

The second pathway is less familiar. It is a channel that connects the roof of the throat region to the nose. When chewing food, aromas are released that access olfactory sensory cells through this channel. Congestion due to a head cold or sinus infection can block this channel, which temporarily affects the ability to enjoy the flavors of food.

But what are odors? They are small molecules that are easily evaporated and released into the environment and that stimulate these sensory cells. Once the olfactory sensory cells detect the odor molecules, they send signals to the brain, where the person can identify the smell and its source.

For most people, a problem with smell is a minor irritation, but for others it may be a sign of a more serious disease or long-term health condition. According to the National Institute of Health, problems with smell become more common as people get older.

Consider:

  • 24.5 percent (15 million) of Americans 55 years old or older have a smell problem.
  • 30 percent of older Americans between the ages of 70 and 80 have a problem with the sense of smell.
  • Two out of three people over 80 have a problem with their sense of smell.
  • A person’s sense of smell generally declines when he or she is over 60.
  • Only one to two percent of people under the age of 65 will experience some problem with their sense of smell.
  • Women of all ages are generally better at detecting odors than men.

There are five types of smell loss:

  • Presbyosmia – Smell that declines with age. It is not preventable.
  • Hyposmia – The ability to detect certain odors is reduced. This smell disorder is common in people who have upper respiratory infections or nasal congestion. This is usually temporary and goes away when the infection clears up.
  • Anosmia – This is when someone can’t detect odor at all. This type of smell disorder is sometimes the result of head trauma in the nose region, usually from an automobile accident or chronic nasal or sinus infections.
  • Dysosmia – This is a change in the perception of odors. Familiar odors may become distorted, or an odor that usually smells pleasant instead smells foul. Sometimes people with this type of smell disorder also experience headaches, dizziness, shortness of breath, or anxiety.
  • Phantosmia – This is when someone perceives a smell that isn’t present at all.

If someone thinks they have a smell disorder, it’s time to visit the doctor. Diagnosis is important because once the cause is found, the doctor may be able to treat it. Many types of smell problems are reversible, but if they are not, counseling and self-help techniques may help the person cope.

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Guide for senior grandparents in Joliet

“Grandparents hold our tiny hands for just a little while, but our hearts forever.” – Anonymous

The joy of being a grandparent is immeasurable. Some think grandparenting is even better than parenting – not as much pressure or worry and lots more sheer enjoyment. And they do go home, don’t they?

Most new grandparents are shocked by the depth of love they experience. It’s as if grandchildren are compensation for growing old.

Grandparenting is an opportunity to play, to love a young child again, and to appreciate the magic of a developing mind. Grandparents can share the things they’re passionate about with a new audience; experience music, nature, the zoo, museums, reading, gardening, theater and other interests in conjunction with a curious young mind.

Grandparenting is an opportunity to watch children develop through all stages of growth; it is an invitation to learn about ‘their’ music and ‘their’ passions and to provide input that parents cannot.

Usually, grandparents have the benefit of interacting on a level that is once removed from the day-to-day responsibilities of parents. This can make it easier to develop a close bond with grandchildren. From near or far, grandparenting can provide continuity in a child’s life, since grandparents are often the family historians who can add a rich sense of family tradition to a child’s life.

Contact with grandparents can teach children positive attitudes towards aging and help them develop skills to enhance their own lifelong learning.

Making the most of your grandparenting time from helpguide.org:

  • Carve out one-on-one time. On occasion, spend time with individual grandchildren. It will give an opportunity to bond, without competition.
  • See the sights. Concerts and plays, movies, zoos, science centers and museums, parks or simple walks in the neighborhood provide opportunities to be together and to exchange ideas and opinions.
  • Play games. Board and card games are a unique opportunity to watch kids in action and to see how they operate in the world. Games also allow you to help your grandchild learn to be a good sport and play fairly.
  • Communicate family history. Tell stories about games or trips you shared when the grandchild’s parents were young. This is a great way to weave a ‘tapestry’ of shared experiences for the whole family.
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Seniors in Joliet find the fountain of youth

There is a fountain of youth, and millions have discovered it. The secret to feeling better and living longer is staying active. The quest is finding a program that works and sticking with it.

Well, why don’t more of us do it? Because many seniors just hate to exercise. Enjoying exercise may seem impossible, but it can be done. Almost any exercise may feel hard at first but, with some practice and consistency, the body gets stronger and that feels good. Will power is needed, especially at first.

But oh, the benefits… Regular exercise can prevent or delay diabetes and heart trouble. It can also reduce arthritis pain, anxiety and depression. It can help older people stay independent longer.

According to nlm.nih.gov, there are four main types of exercise, and seniors need some of each:

  • Strength exercises build muscles and increase metabolism, which helps to keep weight and blood sugar in check. This type of exercise also builds “staying power” and improves the health of the heart and circulatory system.
  • Balance exercises build leg muscles, and this helps to prevent falls. According to the The National Institutes of Health (NIH), American hospitals have 300,000 admissions for broken hips each year, many of them seniors, and falling is often the cause of those fractures.
  • Stretching exercises provide more freedom of movement which allow a person to be more active during his or her senior years. However, stretching exercises alone will not improve endurance or strength.
  • Endurance exercises are any activity—walking, jogging, swimming, biking —that increases heart rate and breathing for an extended period of time. Endurance should be built gradually, starting with as little as five minutes at a time.

Regular exercise and physical activity are important to the physical and mental health of almost everyone, including older adults. Being physically active can help one continue to do enjoyable things and stay independent.

Regular physical activity over long periods of time can produce long-term health benefits. That’s why health experts say that older adults should be active every day to maintain their health.

In addition, regular exercise and physical activity can reduce the risk of developing certain diseases and disabilities that develop as people grow older. In some cases, exercise is an effective treatment for many chronic conditions. Exercise also helps people with high blood pressure, balance problems, or difficulty walking. In fact, studies show that people with arthritis, heart disease, or diabetes benefit from regular exercise. (nia.nih.gov)

One of the great things about physical activity is that there are so many ways to be active. For example, one can be active in short spurts throughout the day, or for a specific time of the day on specific days of the week. Sky’s the limit on choices!

Many physical activities — such as brisk walking or taking the stairs — are free or low cost and do not require special equipment.

Seniors should select something that fits their personalities and lifestyles such as group fitness, Wii fitness games, exercise TV, and exercise videos.

According to nihseniorhealth.gov, a person is more likely to become active on a regular basis if he or she:

  • chooses enjoyable activities,
  • is able to fit them into the schedule,
  • believe in the benefits, and
  • can do them safely and correctly.

Now, let’s get moving!

The Timbers of Shorewood is a rental retirement community which provides independent living and assisted living apartments and a full schedule of activities and services. Furnished apartments are also available for a short-term stay – a weekend, a week, a month or longer.

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